Go to whole of WA Government search

CPBR (Legislative Bank Payments Commission)

CPBR (Legislative Bank Payments Commission)

a pen writing on a checkCPBR (Legislative Bank Payments Commission) announces that you will receive a payment for "$50,000 minimum by cheque in your name".

"This is by no means a joke. All the results concerning you have been officially checked and they are unquestionable," the letter from CPBR states.

"We notify you that the General Management has requested that a payment for '$50,000 minimum by cheque in your name' be made immediately available to you.

"As the definitive winner of a confirmed cheque, we also ask you to contact the person in charge of your dossier."

And you need to respond immediately to get your cheque.

CBPR repeats this assertion again and again to make sure you get the point!

It's just a shame that they don't clearly spell out that "$50,000 minimum by cheque in your name" is actually the name of a competition, not an actual cheque.

You will only find this information in the fine print – and we mean fine print - on one of the bits of paper accompanying this mail out.

Good luck in trying to decipher the conditions of entry into this game because it is in very small type printed over a busy grey image of a building. We had to get the magnifying glass out to read it ourselves!

Basically, it outlines that you haven't actually won anything yet.

The prize draw is just a hook to get you to pay $20 for "The Grand Fortune Bank Insurance". And you guessed it, this has nothing to do with insurance, it's a gaming method.

There is one prize of $50,000 which isn't drawn until December 2007 - so much for the urgency in responding! All other "winners" get "confirmed cheques" which are discount vouchers worth $1,800 for the random gaming method called "Simplified Mathematical Rules for Prosperity".

The fine print even states that CPBR will distribute identical or similar versions of this game over the next six months. Boy, we look forward to that!

Still tempted to enter? Consider what your chances are of winning the $50,000 from a company that sends out misleading letters designed to deceive you into parting with your money!

One thing is for sure: if you respond you will receive other misleading letters just like this one.


Related Scams

  • Lotterywest scams
    Lotterywest scams

    An email using the Lotterywest logo and other unauthorised images has been received by many WA consumers advising them of a bogus Lotto win.

    Read More...
  • Biotal diet pills
    Biotal diet pills

    A Dutch scammer has come up with a particularly distasteful way of flogging diet pills – tell the customer they’ve won pension payments or cash.

    Read More...
  • ILS
    ILS

    ILS claims you have won up to $65,000 in the ILS Big Draw Campaign. This is just another lottery ticket seller. If you are going to play lotto then stick with the government regulated system in Australia. Profits from the Australian lotto system go to legitimate charities that help fellow Australians … not foreign company profits.

    Read More...